What To Do: Goshen Fair tops list of busy local events this weekend

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By Denny Dyroff, Entertainment Editor, The Times

August has arrived and that means it’s time for country fairs, festivals, outdoor concerts, big top circus shows and nature-related events.

Some of the events – such as the Goshen Fair and Das Awkscht Fescht – have been around for a long time.

One of the best summertime fairs is the annual Goshen Country Fair (Goshen Fairgrounds, Park Avenue, East Goshen, 610- 430-1554, www.goshencountryfair.org). The fair, which is celebrating its 73rd anniversary this season, will run now through August 6 at the Goshen Fairgrounds, which are located just off West Chester Pike three miles east of West Chester.

The free family-oriented event is held each year as a benefit for the Goshen Fire Company. It will open at 6 p.m. from Monday through Friday and at 5 p.m. on Saturday.

This is an authentic down-home country fair with all the agricultural events found at most traditional country fairs, including livestock competitions each night at 6 p.m.

The fair will also feature competitions for pies, vegetables, jams and jellies, specimen flowers, bread, cookies, flowering houseplants, cakes, flower arrangements, and candy. Nightly attractions include live music performances, tug-of-war competitions and pie-eating contests.

The schedule for live music includes Chester County Lawmen Band on August 5 and Southern Edge Band on August 6.

You can also take a trip back in time by attending Das Awkscht Fescht (Macungie Memorial Park, Main Street, Macungie, 610-967-2317, www.awkscht.com) — an event that is easy to enjoy and difficult to pronounce.

Das Awkscht Fescht

Das Awkscht Fescht, which is celebrating its 59th anniversary this year, runs from August 5-7 in Macungie, a small town just south of Allentown. It is billed as one of the largest antique and classic car shows in the country with over 3,500 cars on display.

The popular annual event takes its name from “Der Augscht”, which is the Pennsylvania Dutch word for “August.” Das Awkscht Fescht, which is held the first weekend of August each year, is a traditional summer festival with a full roster of family fun events.

There is a completely different car show each day. August 5 features the Variety Show with thousands of pre-1991 automobile models along with a variety of classic tractors, trucks and motorcycles.

On August 6, the spotlight will be on the Antique and Classic Car Show with more than 1,200 antique cars, classic automobiles and sports cars. On August 7, the event is the Special Interest Car Show featuring 35 car clubs with more than 800 vintage autos.

There will be a variety of kids’ shows and activities including jugglers, magicians, ventriloquists, clowns and a special creative activity and display center. Kids of all ages will enjoy the Antique Toy Show, which is held at Eyer Middle School, and Toy Town, which is staged outdoors.

Other attractions include daily bingo sessions, picnics in the park, a playground, a huge public swimming pool, an arts and crafts show featuring over 120 artisans and an “Antique Auto Flea Market.” There will also be fireworks spectacular Saturday at 9:30 p.m.

Admission to the festival is $9 for adults and free for children (15 and under).

Another top attraction in the Lehigh Valley is Musikfest.

Bethlehem’s Musikfest (downtown Bethlehem, 610-332-1300, www.musikfest.org) is a special event — an event that is more than just another popular summertime festival in the Lehigh Valley.

Over the years, Musikfest has established itself as one of America’s top annual music festivals an event that offers big name headliners as well as a wide variety of folk, rock, pop and ethnic music acts.

It also sports some impressive numbers.

The festival, which is celebrating its 33rd anniversary this year, features free music performances on most of its indoor and outdoor stages.

Musikfest, which is running now through August 14, presents more than 300 live musical performances and draws over one million people to the Lehigh Valley every August.

The main concert stage at Musikfest is the Sands Steel Stage which features national touring acts with tickets are required for all shows.

The following is this year’s main stage schedule: August 4, Boyz II Men; August 5, Kip Moore; August 6, Willie Nelson & Family; August 7, Poison; August 8, Counting Crows; August 9, Ziggy Marley; August 10, Disturbed; August 11, Kelsea Ballerini; August 12, Ja Rule and Ashanti; August 13, Alabama; and August 14, Olga Tañón.

There will also be a multitude of free concerts with acts such as Anna Rose, Kendal Conrad, Baha Men, Carsie Blanton, Eric Mintel Quartet, Jeffrey Gaines, The Funkitorium, and Matt Nakoa.

Musikfest is much more than just festival offering a wealth of music. It also features interactive arts and theater activities for children along with a large number of concessions offering a wide array of food and beverage treats.

On August 6, Linvilla Orchards (137 W. Knowlton Road, Media, 610-876-7116, www.linvilla.com) will host its annual Summer Harvest Festival.

The very best of summer fruits and vegetables are all ripe at the same time. Corn, tomatoes, squash, eggplant, peppers, peaches, summer apples, blackberries, nectarines, and sunflowers all fill Linvilla’s store and fields.

A Pick-Your-Own ticket includes a hayride to and from the field, and an empty container to fill fruit or vegetable. Each person over 11 months who would like to go out to the pick your own fields requires a ticket. Pick-Your-Own tickets are $9.

Additionally, Roasty Toasty will be doing his thing — serving up fresh-roasted corn on the cob brushed with butter and sprinkled with your choice of seven different seasonings.

Linvilla’s host for the Summer Harvest Festival will be Silly Joe. Other entertainment will be provided by Paul Downie and Friends and Steve Pullara and his Cool Beans Music.

“Indonesian Festival – The East Side” will be held August 6 at the Fleisher Art Memorial (719 Catherine Street, Philadelphia, fleisher.org).

This year, Modero & Company in collaboration with Fleisher Art Memorial and Gapura Philadelphia, is presenting “The East Side!”

The theme this year highlights the music, dance, and tradition from the eastern part of Indonesia. There will also be authentic Indonesian food vendors, games, door prizes, and more.

“The East Side” is also featuring Indonesian Hip Hop artist SAYKOJI and singers from Ana Timur straight from Indonesia. The Opening Performance will be by Panyembrama Dance.

Other attractions at the festival include Kerupuk Eating Contest, traditional dances from Central Sulawesi, Line & Social Folk Dances (Dero, Tobelo & More) and batik and arts crafts by Davas Batik & Modero.

Authentic Indonesian food will be provided by Pecel Ndeso, Seulanga Cafe, Dapur Ampera, Bakso Super Philly, Fang-Fang’s Snacks, and Wiwas Tempeh.

The Delaware River waterfront hosts a number of cultural celebrations this summer during the PECO Multicultural Series. This weekend, the focus is on two diverse continents.

On August 6, the Race Street Pier will be the location for “Celebrate Asia.”

On August 7, the ACANA African Festival will run from 2-8 p.m. at the Great Plaza.

The annual outdoor concert brings artists, groups, and dance troupes from around the African continent to perform in a free event.

The festival provides a wide range of African entertainment, from traditional dance performances to modern Afropop and reggae musical performances. The family-oriented event also features African food vendors, as well as sales booths with traditional and modern clothing, arts and crafts.

The events, which are part of PECO’s annual multicultural series at Penn’s Landing, will feature native food, cultural exhibits and live entertainment from an array of Asian countries on Saturday and nations from the African continent on Sunday.

Both events are free and open to the public.

A popular event in Delaware this weekend is “Steamin’ Days” at Auburn Heights Preserve (3000 Creek Road, Yorklyn, Delaware, 302-239-2385, http://auburnheights.org) on August 7.

Visitors are encouraged to climb into an antique automobile or board one of the trains and experience what it was like to travel at the turn of the 20th century. They can also tour the magnificent 1897 mansion that was home to three generations of the Marshall family.

Also included is entry to the Marshall Steam Museum, which features the world’s largest operating collection of Stanley steam cars along with a 1930s working Lionel electric train display, a hands-on engine display, kids’ activities and exhibits and the Museum Gift Shop. Self-guided experiences will be available along a designated route to ensure one-way paths and proper spacing.

Free popcorn may be enjoyed by all visitors during Steamin’ Day events and Woodside Farm Creamery will be on-site with delicious ice cream available for purchase. A food truck — Dixie’s Down Home Cooking — will also be on-site at Steamin’ Day.

Activities run from 12:30-4:30 p.m.

Another event this weekend which looks back to a bygone era is being presented by Pennypacker Mills (5 Haldeman Road, Schwenksville, 610-287-9349, http://www.montcopa.org/pennypackermills). “In the Good Old Summertime” will be held on August 7 from 1-3 p.m. at the historic site in Montgomery County.

Visitors to the event will be treated to an afternoon of vintage music on the porch, lawn games and a car show with the Delaware Valley Classic MG Car Club. Other activities include Victorian dress-up for photos, garden tours and hands-on fun in the 1900’s History Center.

Admission is free.

Another Montgomery County Park with a special event this weekend is Pottsgrove Manor (100 West King Street, Pottstown, 610-326-4014, http://montcopa.org/index.aspx?nid=930).

Every Saturday in August, Pottsgrove Manor is presenting “Open House Days.”

Visitors can see something new every Saturday as Pottsgrove Manor highlights items from the collection and welcomes Living History activities throughout the day. They will be able to discover the ins-and-outs of 18th century items with the curator and learn about the trades and skills of the past with living history interpreters.

The weekly themes are: August 6, Collections Curiosity, John Potts Jr. Tall Clock & Miniature Portrait; August 13, Living History – Lemon Tarts made in the Bake Oven; August 20, Collections Curiosity, Philadelphia Desk with secret compartments; and August 27, Living History – Herbalist and Mantua-making (women’s clothing).

Pottsgrove Manor’s staff and living history volunteers will demonstrate 18th-century trades, crafts, and pastimes. Many of the audience-friendly events are interactive.

This event also features free admission.

Longwood Gardens (Route 1, Kennett Square, www.longwoodgardens.org) is always a special place to visit – especially during the run of its annual “Festival of Fountains.”

The 2022 “Festival of Fountains” opened in May and is running through September 26.

This summer is even more special because of light. More specifically because of “Light: Installations by Bruce Munro,” which is artist Bruce Munro’s illuminating new installation at Longwood Gardens.

The exhibit had its debut two weeks ago and will be on view Thursday through Sunday evenings until October 30.

“Light” is an extravagant exhibit that includes eight installations comprising more than 18,000 glowing lightbulbs across Longwood’s outdoor areas and indoor conservatory.

Flamingoes at Longwood

From the luminous “Field of Light” stretching across the Large and Small Lake landscape … to a flamboyance of 1,000 flamingoes wading near the Chimes Tower … to an immersive sensory environment inspired by the Waterlily Display in the Exhibition Hall, the exhibit showcases eight installations spanning Longwood Gardens’ indoor spaces and outdoor vistas.

Daily performances in the Main Fountain Garden will feature more than 1,700 spinning jets that spin dance to various music programs. These are no little jets as some shoot up as high as 175 feet in the air.

The 30-minute show is slated for Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays at 9:15 p.m.

The Main Fountain Garden Show fountain performance that begins with a touch of narrated history and concludes with dynamic choreography marrying music and the site’s newest fountain features.

These displays will be presented daily at 1:15 a.m., 1:15, 3:15 p.m. and 5:15. There will also be performances on Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays at 6:15, 7:15 and 8:15 p.m.

The “Illuminated Fountain Performance” will be staged Thursdays through Sundays at 9:15 p.m.

Live music can be heard in the Beer Garden, where live instrumental music from traditional Celtic tunes to Caribbean steel pan grooves sets the tone Thursday through Saturday evenings.

Beer Garden performances are scheduled through August 28 from 5:30-8:30 p.m. They will also be held in September from 5-8 p.m. on Thursdays, Fridays, and Saturdays.

As always, admission by “Timed Ticket” — tickets issued for specific dates and times. Timed ticketing limits the number of people in the Gardens at any given time and allows guests to enjoy minimal lines and a better viewing experience.

You may enter the Gardens up to 30 minutes prior and 30 minutes after your designated time. Make every effort to arrive at your designated reservation time. Earlier or later arrivals may not be accommodated.

Video link for “Festival of Fountains” — https://youtu.be/AHsC2YuFerY.

Admission to Longwood Gardens is $35 for adults, $32 for seniors (ages 62 and older) and college students, $27 for active military and veterans and $19 for youth (ages 5-18).

This a great time of year to experience the classic tourist attractions of the Brandywine Valley and surrounding areas.

In addition to Longwood Gardens, there are many great sites that combine nature and history – many of which offer both indoor and outdoor attractions.

One of the best ways – and most economically feasible — to explore them is to purchase a Brandywine Treasure Trail Passport.

The Brandywine Valley has quite a few museums and tourist sites that provide residents and tourists ideal opportunities to spend leisure time — and you can maximize your effort if you take advantage of the 2022 Brandywine Treasure Trail Passport.

The cost is $49 for an individual pass and $99 for a family pass (for up to five family members).

The Brandywine Treasure Trail Passport is good for one-time admission to Wilmington and the Brandywine Valley’s top attractions now through October 31.

A family pass, which includes one-day admission to each of 12 sites, can bring a savings of more than $200 for the holders — especially since many of the participating institutions have regular admission fees in double figures.

The list of locations covered by the Brandywine Treasure Trail Passport includes Longwood Gardens, Delaware Museum of Nature and Science, Brandywine River Museum, Delaware Art Museum, Delaware History Museum, Hagley Museum and Library, Delaware Center for Contemporary Arts, Nemours Mansion & Gardens, Read House and Garden, Mt. Cuba Center, Rockwood Museum and Winterthur Museum, Garden & Library.

For more information, call (800) 489-6664 or visit www.visitwilmingtonde.com/bmga/.

The Brandywine River Museum (Route 1, Chadds Ford, 610-388-2700, http://www.brandywinemuseum.org) will be open from 9:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m. with admission to the galleries including two featured exhibitions, “Gatecrashers: The Rise of the Self-Taught Artist in America” and “Dawoud Bey: Night Coming Tenderly, Black.”

“Gatecrashers: The Rise of the Self-Taught Artist in America,” which is running now through September 5, examines how, after World War I, artists without formal training “crashed the gates” of major museums in the United States, diversifying the art world across lines of race, ethnicity, class, ability, and gender.

Included are over 50 works by celebrated painters such as Horace Pippin, Anna Mary Robertson “Grandma” Moses and John Kane, as well as by fifteen artists who are lesser known now but were recognized in their day, including Josephine Joy, Morris Hirshfield, Lawrence Lebduska, Patrick Sullivan, and others.

“Dawoud Bey: Night Coming Tenderly, Black,” which is running through August 31, is a selection of photographs from Bey’s critically acclaimed series from 2017.

Regarded as one of the most important photographers working today, Dawoud Bey (b. 1953) is recognized for his compelling, large-scale portraits and street photographs of marginalized people and communities that he began in the 1970s. Inspired by artist Roy DeCarava (1919—2009), Bey has been photographing the Black community in Harlem where he was born, and Queens where he grew up, for over four decades.

Hagley Museum and Library (Route 141, Wilmington, Delaware, 302-658-2400, www.hagley.org) presents a special event geared for physically active visitors.

Hagley will host “Bike & Hike & Brews” on August 10 from 5-8 p.m. – and every Wednesday evening through August 31.

Visitors to Hagley can enjoy an after-work hike or a picnic along the Brandywine’s most beautiful mile on summer Wednesday evenings from June through August.

It is a family event featuring summer fun in a beautiful outdoor setting. Guests can bring a picnic to enjoy at Hagley’s picnic pavilion on Workers’ Hill or at a picnic table along the Brandywine.

Dogfish Head craft beer and Woodside Farm Creamery ice cream are also available for purchase. You are welcome to bring your own food to “Bike & Hike & Brews,” but outside alcohol is strictly prohibited.

Admission is $5 per person and free for Hagley members and children five and under. Please note that this event is weather-dependent.

Winterthur Museum, Garden & Library (5105 Kennett Pike, Wilmington, Delaware, 800-448-3883, www.winterthur.org) is featuring a Guided Exhibition Tour – “Jacqueline Kennedy and Henry Francis du Pont: From Winterthur to the White House” – now through January 8, 2023.

Visitors can explore the friendship between the First Lady and H. F. du Pont and their work to restore the White House in this guided tour of the special exhibition.

In 1961, an unusual partnership was formed when the youngest First Lady in American history, Jacqueline Kennedy, appointed a reserved octogenarian collector from Delaware, Henry Francis du Pont, to lead her project to restore the White House interiors. Du Pont brought credibility to Kennedy’s efforts and vision, and her enormous popularity lifted him onto the national stage and validated his life’s work.

Together, they transformed the White House from a mere public residence into a museum, and along the way, they engaged with some of the most celebrated interior designers of the 20th century.

For the first time, the story of this historic partnership will be told at Winterthur, the inspiration for Mrs. Kennedy’s project. Through artifacts, archives, and images, this exhibition will invite visitors to experience the behind-the-scenes collaboration between the two during this captivating period in American history.

Their partnership culminated in a televised tour of the White House, led by Jacqueline Kennedy, which became the most watched program in American history. The former First Lady will forever be remembered as the person who restored history and beauty to the White House.

Their “restoration” of America’s most famous house became a history lesson for the country and awakened an interest in preservation and interior design that is still felt today.

A related event will be “Terrific Tuesdays” – a special activity that is running every Tuesday through the end of August.

Visitors are invited to drop in for crafts, games, and demonstrations inspired by Jacqueline Kennedy’s White House restoration in the 1960s. Activities will introduce design, history, art, cultural conservation, and architectural preservation to kids ages 3–10 and the adults they bring with them.

The schedule for “Terrific Tuesdays” is: August 9, Red Room: Fantastic Fabrics; August 16, Blue Room: Contrasting Compositions; August 23, East Room: Entertainment Extravaganza; and August 30, Diplomatic Reception Room: Parley and Printmaking.

Admission to Winterthur is $22 for adults, $20 for seniors and students and $8 for children.

Another site with impressive gardens can be found just across the Pennsylvania-Delaware state line.

Nemours Estate (850 Alapocas Drive, Wilmington, Delaware, www.nemoursestate.org) is open Tuesday to Sunday from 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Reservations are not required and there is no timed entry.

Nemours Estate comprises an exquisite, 77-room Mansion, the largest formal French gardens in North America, a Chauffeur’s Garage housing a collection of vintage automobiles, and 200 acres of scenic woodlands, meadows and lawns.

Nemours was the estate of Alfred I. duPont.

Alfred named the estate Nemours, after the French town that his great-great-grandfather represented in the French Estates General. While looking to the past and his ancestors for inspiration, Alfred also ensured that his new home was thoroughly modern by incorporating the latest technology and many of his own inventions.

The Gardens is one of the estate’s prime attractions.

The two elk at the top of the Vista are the work of French sculptor Prosper Lecourtier (1855–1924), a specialist in animal figures. Lined with Japanese cryptomeria, pink flowering horse chestnuts and pin oaks, the Long Walk extends from the Mansion to the Reflecting Pool.

The 157 jets at the center of the one-acre pool shoot water 12 feet into the air; when they are turned off, the entire “Long Walk” is reflected in the pool. The pool, five and a half feet deep in its deepest section, holds 800,000 gallons of water and takes three days to fill. The Art Nouveau-style, classical mythology-based “Four Seasons” around the pool are by French-born American sculptor Henri Crenier (1873–1948).

Admission to Nemours is $20 for adults, $18 for seniors and $10 for children.

The Delaware Art Museum (2301 Kentmere Parkway, Wilmington, Delaware, www.delart.org) is presenting “Indigenous Faces of Wilmington.”

Indigenous People have built vibrant and diverse cultures — safeguarding land, language, spirit, knowledge, and tradition across generations. This exhibit opens a dialogue to re-introduce, re-discover, and re-educate individuals about the vibrant and intersecting cultures of indigenous people in northern Delaware.

Exhibition photographer Andre’ L. Wright. Jr., who identifies his ancestry as Nanticoke, shares his vision for the exhibit. “Identity is how you and the world see you, and beauty is a combination of qualities that provide a perceptual experience. My heritage and lineage have given me the opportunity to share the story of authentic consciousness, narrative, and beauty of Indigenous People through the art of photography.”

Participants of the ‘Indigenous Faces of Wilmington” exhibit include India Colon Diaz (Taína of Boriken Nation of PR), Rosa Ruiz (Aztec), El Indio (Boricua Taino), Jose Avila Macias and Susana Amador Hernandez (Chichimeca), Olakunle Oludina (Seminole and Cherokee), Abundance Child (Cherokee, Lumbee, Muscogee/Creek), Andre’ L. Wright, Sr. (Cherokee) Sharon L Street Wright (Nanticoke), Jea Street (Nanticoke), Jonathan Whitney (Afro-Indigenous), and Ashanti Morales (Arawak Taína of Boriken).

Additionally, the Delaware Art Museum has a new exhibit that will run through September 11 – “Stan Smokler: Steel in Flux.”

The Delaware Art Museum celebrates the career of Stan Smokler with this Distinguished Artist exhibition. His celebrated found object, steel sculptures continue the trajectory of modernist abstraction.

Smokler completed his Master of Fine Arts degree at Pratt Institute in 1975, and he continued to work in New York on his own sculpture as well as in art conservation and interior design before relocating to the Brandywine Valley in 1999.

In addition to participating in numerous solo and group exhibitions throughout the Mid-Atlantic and Northeast United States, Smokler established his Marshall Bridge Workshop in 2004. The Workshop is an immersive training opportunity for artists of all levels interested in working with welded steel, and Smokler has been praised for his supportive approach to teaching.

“Stan Smokler: Steel in Flux” includes work from the late 1970s through 2020 along with several of the artist’s charcoal and pastel drawings of his completed sculptures. Examples of Smokler’s largescale work will be on view in the Museum’s Copeland Sculpture Garden with an extended showing through October 30, 2022.

With his commitment to exploring the possibilities of steel and mentoring students through his numerous Marshall Bridge workshops and years at the Delaware College of Art and Design, Smokler has guided the trajectory of contemporary abstract sculpture.

Admission to the Delaware Art Museum is $14 for adults, $7 for students, and $6 for youth (ages 7-18).

More art in Delaware can be found in the quaint town of Odessa.

The Historic Odessa Foundation (Main Street, Odessa, Delaware, www.historicodessa.org)  is now presenting its newest exhibition of acrylic paintings — “Color Secrets: Paintings by Jan Crooker.”

The exhibit of colorful acrylics by the talented Kutztown artist is on display now through August 28 in the Historic Odessa Visitor Center Gallery.

For Crooker, who is well-known for her vibrant images of still life, flowers and local scenes and landscapes, color has always been a focus of her artistic expression.

According to Crooker, “I think my love of color harkens back to my early exposure to art at the children’s classes at the Toledo Museum of Art in Ohio. While some kids had favorite stars or athletes, I had favorite artists. My first favorite artist was Vincent Van Gogh.”

Crooker researched the master colorist’s use of color and read his thoughts on the subject. Although she admires other colorist artists, Van Gogh has been the greatest influence on her color use.

Crooker earned a bachelor’s degree in art education from Toledo University, and a Master of Fine Arts from Penn State University.

Historic Rock Ford (Rockford Road, Lancaster, www.discoverlancaster.com) is presenting a new exhibit “Long Rifles of the American Revolution: How Lancaster Craftsmen Helped Win the War.” The exhibit will remain open until October 30.

Historic Rock Ford is collaborating with guest curator John Kolar on the exhibit which will showcase approximately 30 rifles.

The rifles featured in the exhibit are being loaned by museums and private collectors from across the nation and will be used to describe the pivotal role played by the long rifle in winning American independence.

Visitors will be able to examine different rifles while also engaging in the story of the war by highlighting their use in several key battles including the siege of Boston, the battle of New York, Trenton, Saratoga, Kings Mountain and the Miller Block House as well as on the Frontier.

Admission to Rock Ford is $12 for adults, $11 for seniors and youth (ages 6-17).

There are many other area sites that offer a combination of nature and history.

Glen Foerd (5001 Grant Avenue, Philadelphia, www.glenfoerd.org/events) is hosting a guided tour on July 31 at 11 a.m.

Participants can explore the historic Main House with a member of Glen Foerd’s staff. They can also discover how Torresdale came to be and where the name Glen Foerd originated.

Glen Foerd is an 18-acre public park and historic site located along the Delaware River in Philadelphia. Built in 1850 and enlarged in 1902-03, the estate—consisting of historic gardens, an Italianate-Classical Revival style mansion, and multiple additional structures—was saved from potential development through the activism of dedicated neighbors in 1983.

The grounds of Glen Foerd are open daily from 8 a.m.-8 p.m. Access to Glen Foerd is only restricted during private events and after dark. The Glen Foerd mansion is open for public visitation, free of charge, on Fridays, Saturdays, and Sundays from 10 a.m-1 p.m. Visiting the mansion includes access to areas on all four floors of the house, where pieces from Glen Foerd’s historic collection are on display alongside installations by Artists in Residence.

Tickets for the tour are $10.

The American Swedish Historical Museum (1900 Pattison Avenue, Philadelphia, 215-389-1776,www.americanswedish.org) is presenting a new exhibit “Art for All: The Swedish Experience in Mid-America,” which just opened and will run through February 19, 2023.

“Art for All: The Swedish Experience in Mid-America” is an exhibition of paintings and sculptures by Swedish-American artists in the late-19th and early-20th centuries.

This colorful and emotive impressionist art reflects its own time, interprets nature and landscape, and is independent of artificial conventions while keeping Swedish folk traditions alive.

The American Swedish Historical Museum is proud to present Art for All: The Swedish Experience in Mid-America, an exhibition of paintings and sculptures by Swedish-American artists in the late-19th and early-20th centuries. This colorful and emotive impressionist art reflects its own time, interprets nature and landscape, and is independent of artificial conventions while keeping Swedish folk traditions alive.

This exhibition features many Swedish artists who studied and absorbed the democratic philosophies of “art for all,” espoused by Anders Zorn and the Artist’s League. These young artists immigrated to America to forge new career paths. “Art for all” became a catchphrase in Kansas by the 1930s, stemming from efforts of local artists to offer affordable paintings and prints so that every citizen could have original art in their own homes for a richly cultured way of life.

“Art for All: The Swedish Experience in Mid-America” was conceived and developed by the Birger Sandzén Memorial Gallery and the Hillstrom Museum of Art.

There are also many sites to visit if you want to focus more on nature and outdoor settings.

The John Heinz National Wildlife Refuge at Tinicum (8601 Lindbergh Boulevard, Philadelphia, www.fws.gov/refuge/John_Heinz) has several attractive events scheduled for this week.

Bird Walk with Chuck Root and Emily Dodge will be held on August 6 at 8 a.m.

Visitors can take an educational walk with two of the site’s knowledgeable volunteers and discover the 300+ species of birds that use the Refuge during their migration routes.

“Dragonfly & Bird Walk”

“Birds, Butterflies, and Dragonflies Walk” with Cliff and Nancy Hence will be held August 7 at 9 a.m.

Participants will discover the dragonflies and birds of the Refuge.

The walk will meet at the Visitor Center and be at a relaxed paced on flat surfaces.

“Bat Walk” with Biologist Garrett White is scheduled for August 9 at 7:45 p.m.

Participants will be able to learn about different bat species found on the refuge on this special twilight walk.

Walk will begin at archway at the Visitor Center and will last approximately one hour on flat surfaces. Dressing in layers is recommended and bringing bug spray and flashlights is suggested.

Another venue where you can get close to nature is Tyler Arboretum (515 Painter Road, Media, 610-566-9134, www.tylerarboretum.org).

The arboretum’s schedule for this weekend features the “Saturday Evening Wildflower Walk,” on August 6 from 5-7 p.m. and

the “POP-UP: Tasting Station in Lucille’s Garden” from 10 a.m.-1 p.m. on August 7.

At the “Saturday Evening Wildflower Walk,” wildflower expert Dick Cloud will lead an informative two-hour hike that will take visitors through meadows, woods, and occasionally streamside. These walks are for those who have a love of plants, their role in ecology, or for those who want to learn more.

At the “POP-UP: Tasting Station in Lucille’s Garden,” visitors will be able to sample the seasonal bounty from Tyler’s edible garden. No registration is necessary and it’s free with admission.

Admission to Tyler Arboretum is $15 for adults (ages 18-64), $13 for Seniors (65+) and $9 for children (ages 3-17) and Military with valid ID.

Morris Arboretum (100 Northwestern Avenue, Chestnut Hill, www.morrisarboretum.org) is opening a new season exhibit – “Bloomin’ Bubbles.”

Every Tuesday through August, Morris Arboretum is presenting “Bloomin’ Bubbles” from 11 a.m.-noon starting at the Azalea Meadow – weather permitting.

There are more than flowers in bloom this spring and summer at the Morris Arboretum. Visitors are invited to join the arboretum staff for “Bloomin’ Bubbles,” when the Azalea Meadow is transformed into a magical flurry of bubbles for children to play with, play in and pop before lunch.

Guests can celebrate opening day of “Bloomin’ Bubbles” with a “Fairy Parade on the Meadow.”

The parade will begin at the Visitor Center and work its way down to the Azalea Meadow where, if everyone sings loud enough, they might encounter a new Arboretum phenomenon — a flurry of bubbles coming seemingly out of nowhere. This year, the Arboretum has a new bubble-machine.

Participants are encouraged to come dressed as an enchanted woodland creature to dance and play, and then join Melissa in crafting their very own magical wand. They are reminded to not forget their fairy wings, gnome hats, dragon scales, and whatever else they might need to be their most magical selves.

The Morris Arboretum also is offering its “Garden Highlights Tour” this month.

Experienced guides will share both the history and current highlights of the Arboretum during a one-hour walking tour.

Tours depart from the Visitor Center at 1 p.m. each Saturday and Sunday. These tours are small groups and space is very limited.

This reservation is good for admission to the Arboretum as well as for the tour itself. The tour is weather permitting. If the tour is cancelled, your ticket is still good for admission.

Another attraction at Morris Arboretum is the ultra-popular Garden Railway Display, which has become a major summer attraction at the site. The annual edition of the display will remain open until October 10.

The railway has a quarter mile of track featuring seven loops and tunnels with 15 different rail lines and two cable cars, nine bridges (including a trestle bridge you can walk under) and bustling model trains.

The buildings and the display are all made of natural materials – bark, leaves, twigs, hollow logs, mosses, acorns, dried flowers, seeds and stones – to form a perfectly proportioned miniature landscape complete with miniature rivers.

Philadelphia-area landmarks are all meticulously decorated for the holidays with lights that twinkle. There is even a masterpiece replica of Independence Hall are made using pinecone seeds for shingles, acorns as finials and twigs as downspouts.

This year the tracks are surrounded by miniature replicas of “Wonders of the World.” Visitors will be able to see the Eiffel Tower, Hagia Sophia, the Egyptian Pyramids, the Wall of China and more.

Admission is $20 for adults; $18 for seniors (65 and older); $10 for students (ages 13-17 or with ID), active military and retired military; and free for children (under 3).

Hope Lodge (553 South Bethlehem Pike, Fort Washington, 215-343-0965, http://www.ushistory.org/hope/) will be presenting a “Guided Mansion Tours” on August 7.

Hope Lodge was built between 1743 and 1748 by Samuel Morris, a prosperous Quaker entrepreneur. Morris acted as a farmer, shipowner, miller, iron master, shop owner, and owner of the mill now known as Mather Mill. Hope Lodge is an excellent example of early Georgian architecture, and it is possible that Edmund Woolley, architect of Independence Hall, offered advice in building. Samuel Morris owned the estate until his death in 1770.

The site opens at 12:30 p.m. with self-guided tours starting at 1 and 2:30 p.m. The closes at 4 p.m.

Tour admission is $8 for adults, $5 for seniors (age 65+) and for youth ages 6-17, and fee for children under 5. Hope Lodge is a Blue Star Museum which means that active-duty military personnel, including National Guard and Reserve and their families, are admitted free for regular tours from Memorial Day through Labor Day.

Sesame Place (100 Sesame Road, Langhorne, www.sesameplace.com), a family-friendly amusement park in Langhorne, is hosting “Summer Fun Fest” now through September 4. Guests will be able to rock out with Elmo, Abby Cadabby, Cookie Monster and Count von Count.

There’s nothing like summer at Sesame Place. It’s a great time to cool off with refreshing (and splashy) water attractions for all ages, from Big Bird’s Rambling River to The Count’s Splash Castle. Find more fun in the sun with family rides like Captain Cookie’s High C’s Adventure and Oscar’s Wacky Taxi Roller Coaster.
Summer is perfect for meeting your favorite furry friends and taking bright, beautiful pictures with them. There also are exciting shows, special events, parades, dance parties, character dining experiences, and other surprises lined up to give you even more ways to connect.

Ticket prices for Sesame Place start at $49.99.

Peddler’s Village (Routes 202 and 263, Lahaska, 215-794-4000, www.peddlersvillage.com) is celebrating “Peach Month” in August.

It’s a peach and shopping lover’s paradise with plenty of peachy treats, weekend entertainment, and scenic strolls through the Village’s summer gardens.

Visitors will be able to savor the flavors of all things peach from savory to sweet at the Village’s restaurants and weekend outdoor food tent all month long.

This weekend will also be time for Peddler’s Village’s “Annual Sidewalk Sale.”

Starting at 10 a.m. on August 5 and continuing through August 7, the sidewalks of Peddler’s Village will be lined with bargains that will appeal to all. Guests can satisfy their shopping desires – and their tastebuds.

On other August weekends, visitors can enjoy live music while they shop and enjoy peach-themed foods and beverages.

Fresh peaches, peach pies, and peach products will be available on Saturdays and Sundays.

There is never a shortage of fun things to do in Philly.

“Please Touch Museum (4231 Avenue of the Republic, Philadelphia, www.pleasetouchmuseum.org) is hosting “Free Community Days” on four designated Sundays this summer

The popular downtown Philadelphia museum is launching a public health awareness campaign and event series — offering free admission to families on four designated Sundays during the Summer of 2022 — to learn about healthy habits and practices through play-based experiences, and speak with community resource partners on health-related topics.

The theme on August 7 is “Understanding Feelings.”

At the event, which runs from 11 a.m.-4:30 p.m., visitors can learn how we can understand our feelings through special story times, interactive yoga and mindfulness sessions, and Creative Arts Studio programs that explore how we can express our feelings through art.

Keystone First will provide community resources on behavioral health, stress management, and mental health, and Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia will administer COVID-19 vaccines and boosters to all eligible children and adults.

As part of Historic Philadelphia’s anniversary celebration at Franklin Square (200 Sixth Street, Philadelphia, www.historicphiladelphia.org), the organization is illuminating the park with its annual Chinese Lantern Festival.

Now through August 14, Franklin Square (http://historicphiladelphia.org/chineselanternfestival/) will come alive every night with its Chinese Lantern Festival featuring more than two dozen illuminated lanterns – all constructed by lantern artisans from China.

Chinese-inspired performances will take place in Franklin Square twice nightly. Performances, which celebrate Chinese performance art and entertainment, are 30-minutes long and are scheduled for 7 and 9 p.m.

Festival hours are 6-10 p.m. Sunday through Thursday and 6-11 p.m. on Friday and Saturday. Admission is $20 for adults, $18 for youth, seniors and military, and $12 for children (ages 3-12).

Schuylkill Banks Riverboat Tour (www.schuylkillbanks.org/events/riverboat-tours-1) presents “Secrets of the Schuylkill” now through October.

The boat ride is a one-hour family-friendly tour of Philly’s second biggest river featuring sights such as Bartram’s Garden and Fairmount Water Works.

Riders can discover the Hidden River on a fun and educational riverboat tour while seeing spectacular views of Philadelphia.

They can also learn about the past, present, and future of the tidal Schuylkill River and its impact on Philadelphia on a one-hour Secrets of the Schuylkill tour which costs $25 for adults and $15 for children (age 12 and under).

Tours depart from the Walnut Street Dock, under the Walnut Street Bridge, east bank of the Schuylkill River.

Laurel Hill Cemetery (3822 Ridge Avenue, Philadelphia, 215-228-8200, www.thelaurelhillcemetery.org) will present “Sacred Spaces & Storied Places” on August 6 at 10 a.m.

The expansion of Fairmount Park in the 1860s prevented further growth of Laurel Hill East, and in 1869 Laurel Hill West Cemetery was established just across the river in Bala Cynwyd. This walking tour provides a wonderful overview of Laurel Hill West’s long and colorful history, including its architectural artistry, stunning trees and horticulture, and the stories of residents that encompass diverse and fascinating Philadelphia history.

“Sacred Spaces and Storied Places” is the perfect introductory tour for anyone who wants to learn all that Laurel Hill West has to offer. Experienced tour guides offer visitors a unique perspective and every Sacred Spaces tour is different. This weekend’s tour guide is Jen Krivinskas.

On August 7, the Cemetery will present its “Annual Car & Hearse Show” starting at 10 a.m.

Mohnton Professional Car Club (MPCC) welcomes owners of any and all hearses, ambulances, flower cars, limousines, and other funeral service vehicles to participate in its Annual Service Car and Hearse Show, appropriately taking place on the grounds of Laurel Hill East.

This car show is unlike any other.

Vehicles will be on display until 4 p.m. and festivities will be taking place throughout the day —  including a scavenger hunt.

Event entry is free and open to the public.

Grim Philly’s “Dark Philly History Tour” (www.grimphilly.com) will be held every evening throughout the summer.

Participants can walk with tour guides from the grounds of America’s first White House, Congress, and Liberty Bell to homes and sites of Hamilton, Washington, Franklin, Adams, Jefferson, Madison, Monroe, and more than 10 other Founding-Fathers. The surprising dirt of espionage, murder, sexual license and blackmail highlight the secrets of 1776 with a ghost story or two along the way. This tour is highly researched. And your guide is a historian.

Tickets are $35.

Ghost Tour of Philadelphia (215-413-1997, www.ghosttour.com), Ghost Tour of Lancaster (717-687-6687, www.ghosttour.com) and Ghost Tour of Strasburg (717-687-6687, www.ghosttour.com) operate throughout the winter and offer an eerily entertaining evening of true ghost stories and real haunted houses.

The Ghost Tour of Philadelphia, which is based on the book, “Ghost Stories of Philadelphia, PA.,” is a candlelight walking tour along the back streets and secret gardens of Independence Park, Society Hill, and Old City, where ghostly spirits, haunted houses, and eerie graveyards abound.

Participants can discover the ghost lore of America’s most historic and most haunted city with stories from the founding of William Penn’s colony to present-day hauntings.

The activity is open year-round – weekends, December-February; every night, March-November. Tickets are $24.

The Ghost Tour of Lancaster and the Ghost Tour of Strasburg are based on the book, “Ghost Stories of Lancaster, PA.”

Participants in the Ghost Tour of Lancaster explore the long-forgotten mysteries of one of America’s oldest cities, with haunting tales of otherworldly vigils, fatal curses, and star-crossed lovers. The tour provides the opportunity to experience 300 years of haunted history from the Red Rose City’s thorny past. Tickets are $20.

The Ghost Tour of Strasburg is a candlelight walking tour of the quaint and historic town of Strasburg in the heart of Pennsylvania Dutch Country. Visitors will experience an entertaining evening with a costumed tour guide spinning tales of haunted mansions, eerie graveyards, and spirits that roam the night … in a town lost in time. Tickets are $20.

Wonderspaces at the Fashion District (27 North 11th Street, Philadelphia, philadelphia.wonderspaces.com) is an experiential, interactive arts venue.

Building on the success of annual pop-up shows in San Diego, and its first permanent location in Scottsdale, Arizona, Wonderspaces opened a 24,000 square foot gallery space in Philly a year ago.

Wonderspaces features 14 art installations that all play with the idea of perspective.  The artwork ranges from award-winning virtual reality short film about a dinner party-turned-alien abduction, to a room where visitors digitally paint the walls with the movement of their bodies.

New artworks rotate in every few months, creating an ever-evolving, year-round show.

Tickets are for entry at a specific date and time. Visitors are welcome to stay as long as they please during operating hours. The average time spent experiencing the show is 90 minutes.

A few installations contain flashing lights, images, and patterns that may trigger seizures for people with photosensitive epilepsy. All visitors must sign a waiver prior to being admitted into the space. Adult supervision is required for visitors under 16.

This summer, giraffes at area zoos will have a variety of dining partners joining them for meals.

The Philadelphia Zoo (3400 West Girard Avenue, Philadelphia, www.philadelphiazoo.org) has opened a new “Giraffe Feeding Encounter.”

Now guests can get up close to the zoo’s giraffe trio in this all-new feeding experience. “Giraffe Encounter” is scheduled from 10:00 a.m. to noon and 1-4 p.m. daily.

General admission for the Giraffe Encounter is $6; Individual, Dual, Family, and Family Plus members is $5; and Family Deluxe and above is $4. Each guest gets one piece of browse to feed. Browse is vegetation, such as twigs and young shoots, eaten by animals. Depending on the day, guests can feed our giraffes acacia browse (which is what giraffes eat in the wild) or another variety like mulberry or honeysuckle.

Considered the tallest land animals in the world, male giraffes can reach up to 18 feet tall and weigh close to 3,000 lbs. Listed as “vulnerable” by the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN), with scientists estimating there are fewer than 100,000 surviving in the wild, giraffe are affected by poaching and habitat destruction, with populations decreasing more than 40% over the last three decades.

The Elmwood Park Zoo (1661 Harding Boulevard, Norristown, www.elmwoodparkzoo.org) is hosting “Breakfast with the Giraffes” on August 13.

Guests can enjoy a delicious, socially distanced outdoor breakfast buffet, right next to the zoo’s three towering giraffes. After participants have cleared their plates, they will be invited to an exclusive giraffe feeding.

The breakfast will get underway at 8:30 a.m.

As a special attraction, “Dhoruba Birthday Celebration Week” will run from August 8-12.

Dhoruba, one of the Zoo’s popular giraffes, is turning 13 on August 12.

Treetop Quest Philly (51 Chamounix Drive, Philadelphia, www.treetopquest.com) is an aerial adventure park that will challenge you physically and mentally as you maneuver from tree to tree through obstacles and zip-lines. Once you’re equipped, they will teach you how to operate your equipment and you’ll be able to swing through each course as many times as you want for 2.5 hours.

Each participant is outfitted with a harness and gloves. Each course has a continuous belay system — a lifeline that is impossible to detach without a staff member. The activity is self-guided, and the staff is ready to assist when needed.

Gloves are required for our activity. During this time, we encourage participants to bring their own gloves to use while up in the trees, gardening gloves are perfect for this activity.

Ticket prices are $55, adults; $48, ages 12-17; $38, ages 7-11.

“TreeTrails Adventures Trevose” (301 West Bristol Pike, Trevose, treetrails.com/trevose-pa) is an adventure park full of fun challenges for outdoor adventurers of all ages.

Participants can experience the rush of TreeTrails Adventures as they swing through the trees of the new adventure park. They will be able to discover the excitement of climbing and zip lining above the forest floor with r family, friends, co-workers, or teammates.

The park, which is based at Phoenix Sport Club in Bucks County, offers two ways to experience climbing – TreeTrails Adventure Park and KidTrails Park. Young explorers can enjoy miniaturized courses in the adjacent KidTrails Park.

General Park Admission prices are: Main Park Adult Tickets (Ages 12+), $59; Main Park Youth Tickets (Ages 7–11), $51; KidTrails Tickets (Ages 4–7), $12.

Several tourist rail lines will be running special excursions this weekend.

The West Chester Railroad ( www.westchesterrr.net) is running its “Summer Picnic Specials” every Sunday now through Sept 18. There will be one excursion each day at noon.

Passengers can enjoy a 90-minute round trip train ride from West Chester to Glen Mills and return on a warm summer afternoon. Riders are invited to pack a lunch to have during excursion’s stop at the Glen Mills train station picnic grove.

Tickets are $17 for adults, $15 for children (2-12) and free for children (under two).

The Reading Blue Mountain and Northern Railroad (Reading Outer Station, Reading, www.rbmnrr-passenger.com) is running “All Day Train Excursions” every Saturday and Sunday in August and September.

Passengers can take a train excursion through Pennsylvania’s beautiful landscape to Jim Thorpe, Pennsylvania. They can board the train at the Reading Outer Station, Port Clinton Station, or Tamaqua Station.

During the trip, riders will see rolling farmland, beautiful mountains, glistening lakes, and small towns along the railroad’s mainline. The train will also travel through tunnels and over bridges — a highlight being the Hometown High Bridge.

Once the excursion arrives in Jim Thorpe, riders have more than 3.5 hours to explore the many shops, restaurants, and attractions before boarding the train for your return trip.

While in Jim Thorpe, they can also ride one of the rail line’s 70-minute Lehigh Gorge trains at a discounted rate.

Tickets for the all-day excursion are $39 from the Reading Outer Station and Port Clinton Station and $24 from the Tamaqua Station.

Wilmington and Western Railroad (Greenbank Station, 2201 Newport-Gap Pike, Wilmington, Delaware, www.wwrr.com) is running its “Yorklyn Limited” on Saturdays in August with departures at 12:30 and 2:30 p.m.

Riders can take a leisurely 1.5-hour round-trip ride up the Red Clay Valley to the Mt. Cuba Picnic Grove, where they can de-train to enjoy a half-hour layover along the banks of the Red Clay Creek to have a picnic or simply admire the natural surroundings.

For those who don’t want to get off the train at Mt. Cuba, they can remain onboard and travel further up the line through the communities of Ashland and Yorklyn. On the return trip, there will be a brief stop at Mt. Cuba to pick up the picnic passengers.

The “Yorklyn Limited” excursion is the re-branded name of the “Mt. Cuba Meteor” excursion.

These trips are powered by one of Wilmington and Western Railroad’s historic first-generation diesel locomotives.

Tickets are $18 for adults, $17 for seniors and $16 for children (ages 2-12).

On August 6, the Colebrookdale Railroad (South Washington Street, Boyertown, www.colebrookdalerailroad.com) is running its “Secret Valley Expedition” at 3 p.m.

The tourist rail line’s two-hour expedition into the Secret Valley features rides on meticulously restored century-old rail cars and visits one of the most scenic and historic regions in the northeast.

The railroad will be offering a lunch and dinner aboard the Secret Valley Expedition to all dining class passengers.

Additionally, and a la carte menu is available in all cars and all passengers have access to the open car for near 360-degree views of the Secret Valley.

The Northern Central Railway (2 West Main Street, New Freedom, www.northerncentralrailway.com) is running its “Glen Rock Express” this weekend.

On August 6, the tourist railroad is running its “Glen Rock Express” with three departures – 11 a.m., 12:30 and 2 p.m.

The train travels to Glen Rock and back with powered by the NCR’s vintage PRR GP9 Diesel Locomotive built in 1959.

The ride follows the route of the original Northern Central Railroad through the scenic Heritage Rail Trail County Park.

Tickets are: $36, Adult (Ages 13+); and $23, Child (age 2-12).

The New Hope Railroad (32 Bridge Street, New Hope, www.newhoperailroad.com) is running its “Grapevine Express,” which features “Wine & Cheese Tasting” on Saturdays and Sundays in August at 5 p.m. each night.

Riders are invited to take part in a romantic “Wine and Cheese Excursion” and enjoy fine gourmet cheese, artisan crackers, meats, fruit, and our featured local wines. Additional Alcoholic and Non-Alcoholic beverages are also available onboard.

Wine and cheese will be served to passengers as they travel along the same railroad line passengers did when it was built in 1891 connecting New Hope with Philadelphia. The journey travels through the beautiful hills and valleys of Bucks County, along once vital waterways and streams and across numerous trestle bridges.

The excursions will take place aboard one of the railroads lavishly appointed early 1900’s first-class parlor cars.

Tickets are $102.58 (Ages 21 and older only).

The Strasburg Railroad (Route 741, Strasburg, www.strasburgrailroad.com) is running its “Wine & Cheese Train” on Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays in August at 5 p.m. on Thursdays and 7 p.m. on Fridays and Saturdays.

Passengers can enjoy the luxurious, climate-controlled first-class accommodations and a tasting of select wine, cheese, and crackers as they travel in style down the tracks from Strasburg to Paradise and back. The train departs at 7 p.m. and the total trip time is 45 minutes.

“Wine & Cheese Train” boarding is 30 minutes before the scheduled departure. Riders must be 21 or older and have their photo ID ready when they board.

Featured wines are carefully selected from Waltz Vineyards, and cheeses are paired accordingly. Beer and select non-alcoholic beverages are also available for purchase upon request. Riders can purchase a souvenir wine glass on board the train if desired. Glasses are $7 each.

In accordance with Pennsylvania law, alcohol is only served during the train ride. The rail line is not permitted to serve alcoholic beverages while the train is berthed in the station.

This popular train is available on select Friday and Saturday evenings throughout the season. Tickets are $50.

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